Tag Archives: Ludwig von Mises

How Minimum Wage Laws Fly in the Face of the Irrefutable Law of Supply-And-Demand

A few weeks ago, I posted an article entitled Eleven Facts About the Minimum Wage Barack Obama Forgot to Mention, which I found on a website called The Federalist, and which was written by a man named Sean Davis, about whom I know next to nothing. I liked his article, however, and I was surprised…

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Lemonade Stands: Instead Of Teaching A Kid About Running A Business, She Got A Lesson In Government Regulation [UPDATED]

The following is, on a micro level, a perfect compendiation of free-trade versus government regulation, all in the name of the so-called common good. It was written by a bureaucrat (no less) fellow free-marketeer named Nicolas Martin, who’s the executive director of the Consumer Health Education Council in Indianapolis — and whom I incorrectly branded…

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Say What?

Government is not reason, it is not eloquence — it is force. Said George Washington. The state is the coldest of all cold monsters that bites with stolen teeth. Said Nietzsche. Government is solely an instrument or mechanism of appropriation, prohibition, compulsion, and extinction; in the nature of things it can be nothing else, and…

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The Apotheosis Of Ron Paul [Updated]

Concerning Ron Paul, Cory Massimino and friends are coming under some fire for a fine article, which recalls a newspaper piece the Fort Collins Weekly published back in 2008. Here’s an excerpt from Cory’s article: Hans Herman-Hoppe, distinguished fellow of the Mises Institute, wrote just last year that, “it is societies dominated by white heterosexual…

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What’s the Difference Between Communism, Socialism, Progressivism, & Welfare Statism

Communism is a species of the genus socialism. It is one of the many variations on the theme. Communism explicitly calls for the violent overthrow of government. In theory, it is an anarchist ideology which believes that the state will one day magically “wither away,” as Karl Marx famously phrased it, though only after an…

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Middle-of-the-Road Policy Leads to Socialism

Economics deals with society’s fundamental problems; it concerns everyone and belongs to all. It is the main and proper study of every citizen (Ludwig von Mises, Human Action). The following address was delivered before the University Club of New York, April 18, 1950, by Doctor Ludwig von Mises: How Middle-of-the-Road Policy Leads to Socialism The…

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How Capitalism Enriches The Poor And The Working Class

When portable radios first appeared in American stores, the average American worker had to labor 13 hours to buy one; today he or she toils for about 1 hour. In the 1920s it took 79 hours of work to buy a nice men’s suit; today it takes less than half that. At the beginning of…

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Rose Wilder Lane And The Discovery Of Freedom

In 1943, a lady by the name of Rose Wilder Lane published a book called The Discovery of Freedom. It’s an absolutely original work of non-fiction, a salvo to human energy and the creative mind unshackled, and it influenced classic liberals beyond number — and yet it has largely gone unacknowledged. From a good review…

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Natural Resource and Goods Theory

The two essential claims of the environmentalists, which I take for granted are already well known to everyone, are (1) that continued economic progress is impossible, because of the impending exhaustion of natural resources (it is from this notion that the slogan “reduce, reuse, recycle” comes), and (2) that continued economic progress, indeed, much of…

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Socialism, Nazism, and Environmentalism

The National Socialist German Workers’ Party was founded in 1919 and abolished in 1945. It came into full power under Adolph Hitler in 1933, and proceeded at that time to slaughter a spectacular number of people in a relatively short span of years. Socialists today are of course universally agreed that Nazism was many things,…

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