The Truckdriver

The trucker who lives next door is seldom home.

He’s a long-haul trucker, he’s over-the-road. He earns good money and does not spend. Something of the ascetical about him. He’s forty. His hair is long. He wears jeans and combat boots. Sallow and haggard, his face is handsome nevertheless. His willowy wife does not ride with him but stays at home. They have no children. The wife is solitary, long-legged and tan. She has a ponytail of sandy-brown. She smokes Marlboro’s. They do not rent but own. The wife spends hours in her garden, or she reads in her backyard. Her eyes are pensive. She waves to us but rarely speaks.

The trucker who lives next door arrives at unexpected hours, on unexpected days. Emerging from his rig, he has the leanness of a desert prophet about him. I imagine him eating very little while he’s out on the road. He transports the goods from north-to-south. He hauls the freight from coast-to-coast. He kisses his wife in the driveway. They hold hands and enter their tidy cottage together. They shut the door behind.

Sometimes, on holidays, his rig will sit for three or four consecutive nights along our residential side street. It sits gleaming in the dark. The trucker loves his rig; it is his home away from home. Once, in the middle of the night, I heard a gentle noise outside and crept up to the window. The trucker who lives next door was polishing his semi with a white cloth in the moonlight. The semi is midnight-blue and chrome.

Here on the ragged edge of this desert town where the ancient railroad tracks lie rusting in the grass, the frontiers begin. This is the frontier the trucker crosses and re-crosses year around. Our town is like many western towns, with its looping river and cauliflower clouds, its one Masonic lodge and the hard clean skies above, and in the distance, fields of clay where woolly mammoth once knelt down in the soft earth to die, and a billion bison bones fossilize in the ground. Beyond the backyards, the interstate curves off into the lonesome horizon, and the distant cars make very little sound.

32 Comments

  • Capitalist

    March 27, 2010

    Nice soliloquy, Ray. A moment away from the stress of the siege.

    Reading Dostoevsky, I see his influence on your work. Also, I find the contrast between Russia circa 1849 in Crime and Punishment and America 1849 in Blood Meridian quite fascinating. It seems the Russians failure to embrace freedom maintained a relatively stable culture since that time, where American freedom allowed us significant advances and evolution. It’s a pity our country is turning away from our traditional freedoms and self-reliance, and towards something mindful of tsarist or soviet-style rule.

  • ShyButIntrigued

    March 28, 2010

    Ray,

    I wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed this. You make me want to write.

  • Ray

    March 30, 2010

    My thanks to you both.

  • christine gacharna

    March 31, 2010

    Capitalist says it best: “A moment away from the stress of the siege.”

  • Nick

    March 31, 2010

    “Also, I find the contrast between Russia circa 1849 in Crime and Punishment and America 1849 in Blood Meridian quite fascinating. It seems the Russians failure to embrace freedom maintained a relatively stable culture since that time, where American freedom allowed us significant advances and evolution. It’s a pity our country is turning away from our traditional freedoms and self-reliance, and towards something mindful of tsarist or soviet-style rule.”

    Cap, how did you get that from a short short story about a truck driver?

  • Redmond

    March 31, 2010

    Hello Ray

    Great piece

    SBI – Ray has inspired me to write, and share my ideas – go for it!!

    It feels great…

    Later

    Redmond

  • BedazzledCrone

    March 31, 2010

    Nick: I suspect that the Dostoevsky reference is to Ray’s book. However, I have to admit that my jaw dropped at trying to figure out how Crime and Punishment versus Blood Meridian would ever get one to the Russia versus America comparison. Perhaps because Raskolnikov’s existential questioning of his existence and his consistent feelings of guilt finally lead him to confess his crime of murder and accept responsibility for his crime and thus, accepts his punishment, while Judge Holden remains the selfish violent cruel sadistic bastard he was at the beginning right to the end? If that’s where America found its “traditional freedoms and self-reliance”, that is, in the reality of the Galton gang, then all I can say is, if there is a divinity of any sort, may the PTB have mercy on your souls, you’ll need it.

    So Capitalist, I paraphrase Nick’s question “How did you get there?”

  • Capitalist

    March 31, 2010

    Ray recommended both books to me, so, Nick, the comment is only related to Ray’s soliloquy in a general literary sense. Indeed, Dostoevsky did seem to influence the telling in More and More Unto the Perfect Day, which I hope you have read.

    Thank you, Christine. I think we share the perception that being told that the loss of a single election justifies the spiteful pursuit of an unbridled redistribution ideology, which has our Constitution under siege.

    Crone, you look too deep for the meaning of the comment. (Note we both err: Crime and Punishment plays out in perhaps mid-1860s, and the kid rode with the Glanton gang.) It’s not so much the philosophic contemplations, but the general societal evolution.

    America’s west was rife with cruelty exemplified by more than just Holden or Glanton. As a liberal, you want to smear my comment and insinuate that cruelty is the root of our freedom and self-reliance. The truth is, America was a wild and wooly cruel place, but we outgrew that and evolved into a society capable of great things. Why? Because in America hard work and self-reliance can, and often has, change a poor man into a rich one. It is the evolution that is astounding.

    In contrast, it seems as though Russia, then as now, is a caste system. Caste mobility is extremely rare. The poor remain so, and the rich retain power while feigning their good intentions. It is the lack of evolution that is instructive.

    Consider a major lever of the liberal left in America today. “The rich” have an income of more than some amount, let’s say $200k a year. Note that this proclamation is made by those who possess wealth, exempt themselves from most of their well-meaning programs, cheat when they can’t exempt, or just give themselves raises to offset any additional burden their laws may have on them. So, exactly how does a poor woman become rich, when her income is confiscated by the tenets of social redistribution?

    In other words, a major consequence of redistributionist rhetoric and action is to create a caste system, where the current rich remain so, and the aspiring rich face insurmountable tax burdens. I suppose that’s what you would call “social justice.” A capitalist would call it disincentive.

    Hence, the contrast. When America was the land of the free, someone like me who came from common (poor) stock could work hard and achieve wealth. That’s why my Russian friend, like so many others, came here: to at least have a chance to rise above, to escape the discriminations of a caste system. To them, you give the “gift” of Obama, Reid, and Pelosi. And liberals are offended because he isn’t saying “thank you sir, may I have another.”

  • Nick

    April 1, 2010

    “More and More Unto the Perfect Day, which I hope you have read.”

    Getting there, getting there. Joel just flipped his car.

    I read with the speed of Darwinian evolution.

  • Capitalist

    April 1, 2010

    LOL, Nick. A rare moment of humility. Enjoy. Maybe a little less pop culture will free you up?

    Where I think Ray runs away from Dostoevsky is his use of language to provide an often surreal experience. I had to read it a second time to recognize elements that did not seem important the first time through.

  • Nick

    April 1, 2010

    Well, my parents have been getting on my case a lot lately. You know, they just don’t understand who I am.

    Shooting bitches in Modern Warfare and watching “South Park” are really my only outlets.

  • ScummyD

    April 8, 2010

    Well, I wish I had a more intelligent response, but I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed reading this little story. I was thinking while reading how much it read like good fiction. It was interesting to see others felt the same.

    “If that’s where America found its “traditional freedoms and self-reliance”, that is, in the reality of the Galton gang, . . .”

    America found its freedoms and self-reliance among those rugged individuals that defeated the gangsters and outlaws in one way or another. Honest hard working individuals that, by the way, far out numbered outlaws. Interesting you choose to highlight a slim sliver minority of outlaws while ignoring the hundreds of thousands of other Americans who paved the way for civilization and the rule of law through their nondescript fairly boring daily toil.

    “America was a wild and wooly cruel place, but we outgrew that and evolved into a society capable of great things.”

    America never outgrew being a wild and cruel place. Look at the crimes and violence in the domestic sphere today. Those elements, however, were never and are not now the major characteristic of American society. America has long been a society that is capable of great things (Is not defeating in the American Revolution what was at the time the world’s most powerful empire a great thing?). What happened was that the majority of citizens won out over the outlaw elements through their daily, ceaseless march toward a better future for themselves through honest hard work aimed at bettering their lot. We didn’t outgrow or evolve as much as simply persevered over the darker figures in our history.

  • Ray

    April 8, 2010

    It’s good to see you, ScummyD. Thanks for your comment.

    And thanks for dropping by.

  • Capitalist

    April 8, 2010

    Granted, there are places I prefer to avoid, and people that are cruel, mean, evil. However, you are correct to observe this is a minority element in our society (it’s interesting to note that localities under extended liberal rule are the ones where you and I are least safe).

    Let me take that one step further: Americans are far and away the most compassionate and charitable people on Earth. Our freedom allowed prosperity, and prosperity facilitates generosity. Said another way, why are all those well-meaning socialist countries such tightwads when some poor country gets hit by an earthquake or tsunami?

  • Nick

    April 10, 2010

    CAPITALIST WROTE: It’s interesting to note that localities under extended liberal rule are the ones where you and I are least safe.

    No doubt. I can’t tell you how many times I had to duck behind a Volkswagen Microbus or an organic fruit stand to avoid being strafed in a drive-by shooting when I was in Berkeley last summer. Total Thunderdome over there.

    CAPITALIST WROTE: Let me take that one step further: Americans are far and away the most compassionate and charitable people on Earth.

    Let me take that another step further: According to the latest findings in the April edition of “Statistics I Pulled Out of My Ass and Can’t Possibly Back Up but Sound Good When I Post Them on a Blog,” Americans are actually the third most compassionate people on Earth. They’re behind the citizens of Sweden (1) and Freedonia (2).

    CAPITALIST WROTE: Said another way, why are all those well-meaning socialist countries such tightwads when some poor country gets hit by an earthquake or tsunami?

    They’re busy donating money to those poor countries while Americans sit around and post shit on the Internet.

    http://www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/cdi/
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_charitable_countries

  • Taxpayer

    April 13, 2010

    I’ll give you credit, the wiki puts the U.S. at the top in absolute charitable dollars. The other reference is interesting, but based on questionable ideology. Since your measure of generosity emphasizes money and liberal ideology, it’s easy to downgrade the U.S.

    On the other hand, I wonder how many people Sweden set free with the blood and wealth of their country? Oh, I guess the lives of our soldiers freeing Europe and the rest the world from tyranny in WWII, the Muslims in Yugoslavia, and the Iraqis from S.H. (to name a few) really don’t count for shit in your opinion. I also wonder if the money taken from us by force and donated through our military in places like Haiti and Indonesia factor in, not that you’d give a shit.

    Speaking of not giving a shit, you are so quick to dispute “Americans sit around and post shit on the Internet”, but never object to the lies of your adored liberal rulers. I guess that doesn’t count, because it advances the liberal cause, and fuck the truth when that’s at stake.

    Sorry I conveyed an opinion without spending inordinate time digging around to adopt the position of liberal think tanks and thought police. I guess I spend too much time trying to support my family and pay for all that government-imposed liberalism you so love, and thinking that America’s role as a beacon and protector of freedom was somehow a part of the equation.

    Finally, take a walk around Detroit some night instead, and let me know how safe you feel there.

  • Nick

    April 17, 2010

    I figured you wouldn’t be able to scroll down a web page. I’ll help you out:

    “Large countries scored relatively high on the preceding list, because they have more citizens and thus more money. To provide an alternative perspective, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development also lists countries by the amount of money they give as a percentage of their gross national income. This list is as follows:[1]

    1. Sweden – 1.02%
    2. Norway – 0.89%
    3. Luxembourg – 0.84%
    4. Netherlands – 0.81%
    5. Denmark – 0.8%
    6. Ireland – 0.54%
    7. United Kingdom – 0.51%
    8. Belgium – 0.5%
    9. Austria – 0.47%
    10. France – 0.47%
    11. Finland- 0.4%
    12. Switzerland – 0.39%
    13. Germany – 0.36%
    14. Spain – 0.32%
    15. Australia – 0.3%
    16. Canada – 0.29%
    17. Iceland – 0.27%
    18. New Zealand – 0.27%
    19. Japan – 0.25%
    20. Portugal – 0.21%
    21. Italy – 0.2%
    22. Turkey – 0.18%
    23. United States – 0.18%
    24. Greece – 0.17%”

    Suck it, you Greek misers!

    And thanks for putting all those arguments in my mouth. For instance, when I wrote, “Americans are actually the third most compassionate people on Earth. They’re behind the citizens of Sweden (1) and Freedonia (2)” what I really meant was, “I personally disregard the efforts of every American soldier who hit the beaches at Normandy or Peleliu.” I can’t believe you cracked my liberal code so easily. Hats off.

    Let’s see… What else? Oh yes.

    TWO-BIT, PARANOID, PSEUDO-CONSERVATIVE HACK WROTE: “you are so quick to dispute “Americans sit around and post shit on the Internet.”

    I don’t dispute that at all.

    TWO-BIT, PARANOID, PSEUDO-CONSERVATIVE HACK WROTE: “Sorry I conveyed an opinion without spending inordinate time digging around to adopt the position of liberal think tanks and thought police.”

    No apologies necessary. I’m just disappointed you couldn’t spend SOME amount of time adopting the position of someone who has his head at least halfway out of his ass. Not to worry, though. Consider my expectations lowered.

    TWO-BIT, PARANOID, PSEUDO-CONSERVATIVE HACK WROTE: “my family…”

    Bullshit. You could never get laid.

    TWO-BIT, PARANOID, PSEUDO-CONSERVATIVE HACK WROTE: …”and pay for all that government-imposed liberalism…”

    Dude, spare me. The check I just wrote to the IRS looked like something Ed McMahon used to deliver to unsuspecting people’s front doors.

    Lastly, although you hinted at it you completely forgot to add “if it wasn’t for us, everyone would be speaking German right now.” It’s an oldie but goodie. Can’t believe you left it out.

    Seriously, your last post was pretty tired. It was the quintessential goofball conservative rant. That’s the best you have? Changing the subject and shitty straw man arguments?

    Look, it’s the weekend. Go ahead and wrap your bi-annual erection in an American flag and jack it to the latest paparazzi picture of Sarah Palin. It’s what all true Americans do nowadays, isn’t it?

  • Taxpayer

    April 17, 2010

    You’re right, I’m damaged goods. Serving my country, like my Dad in WWII and Korea, is of no value, and the worldwide humanitarian efforts of our military counts for naught. I don’t trust your sources, BTW. Yep, your comment confirms the typical liberal denigration of Americans, and makes clear we should abandon self-reliance and give our all to whatever liberals say so we can earn their respect (which is obviously impossible).

    What I need is a good dose of that Stupidisasliberaldoes drug you enjoy. Then I could be a vitriolic asshole like you who adores all things liberal and lives in denial of the assault on our freedom.

    As usual, you attack any who question the goodness of liberalism, and never challenge the lies of the left. And, of course, you go for the personal attack. Typical.

    So, get Obama’s dick out of your mouth, and name one thing about liberal policy you disagree with.

  • ShyButIntrigued

    April 18, 2010

    Nick can have Obama’s dick back when I’m through with it and not a moment sooner. Sorry, Nick. Almost done.

  • E.A. Blair

    April 18, 2010

    Nick Said

    To provide an alternative perspective, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development also lists countries by the amount of money they give as a percentage of their gross national income. This list is as follows:[1]

    I wonder Nick – is that private charitable giving?

    Or is that giving by their Socialist governments?

    And does giving away free guns count?

  • Taxpayer

    April 18, 2010

    E.A., you must remember that liberals think only they are allowed to define what qualifies as charity, and you have to look past the bullshit figures to understand why they are portrayed that way. By trying to demonstrate Americans are stingy bastards, especially compared to prosperous socialist countries, the implication is that government forcing us to give e.g. “free” health care to “the uninsured” is justified, because we wouldn’t do it otherwise. Bunk!

    There is no objective measure for charity, and so what if some blogger says Americans are charitable. Did I hurt someone by saying that? No. Does the Obama agenda of deliberately bankrupting America hurt everyone? Yes. So why is Nick so worked up over my comment, and so nonplussed over what the Democrats are doing to our country? Stupidisasliberaldoes, maybe? Or perhaps good ol’ Marxist ideology?

  • E.A. Blair

    April 18, 2010

    Hmmmm

    If there is no Objective measure for Charity, then maybe you should not have brought it up as a point.
    Argue when the facts and numbers are on your side.

    Don’t even attempt to fight in the area of relativism – circular reasoning, no logic.

    Check my comments here

    http://rayharvey.org/index.php/2010/02/the-great-overpopulation-myth/#comment-683

    Absolutely Skewers him.

    Good Night.

  • Taxpayer

    April 18, 2010

    How do you measure the sacrifices America (and some important allies like Canada and Great Britain) have made in the interest of freedom, against tyranny? Just how much political discussion – argument – can actually be objective? All too often we see political action place party and power over the best interests of the people. Widespread political deception is an obvious example of this.

    In my opinion, it’s really quite simple. Conservatism seeks to protect individual freedoms, and “liberalism” seeks to deprive us of freedom by imposing its ideology through the government.

    Agreed, the bailouts were pure insanity, and I never opined otherwise. “I see no warrant in the Constitution” seems applicable here. All I was getting at is a reiteration of Ray’s assertion, essentially, government isn’t the solution, government is the problem. Obviously, more government will prove to be a bigger problem!

    You’re right about Nick, of course. On the other hand, an occasional rant is good the the soul, eh?

    Best to you too.

  • E.A. Blair

    April 18, 2010

    Good Morning Taxpayer

    You say

    How do you measure the sacrifices America (and some important allies like Canada and Great Britain) have made in the interest of freedom, against tyranny?

    You don’t.

    That country no longer exists. Some of the ones who fought in say WW2 are still alive, but they don’t run the country.

    If we are going to win this fight – you need to have more allies than enemies.
    Start by admitting that no president for the last 30 years has been anything but a statist inerventionist.
    Admit that both the Republican and Democatic patries are two sides of the same corporatist coin.
    Admit that both parties thoroughly enjoy shredding the constitution.
    Admit that the war in Iraqs and Afghanistan are unjust, and in the certainly in the case of Iraq, was started based on a lie, and that the only just course of action is to withdraw the troops as soon as possible.
    Admit that people such as Glen Beck and Sarah Palin are dangerous.
    Admit that Fox News, CNN, etc. etc. are nothing but distributors of state propaganda.
    Admit that social wedge issues such as race and abortion are exploited in order to divide and conquer the American People.
    Admit that America is now seen in much of the world as an Heartless Imperial Power. Concerned only with subjugating the world to its own interest.
    Admit that because of the greed, and the despicable institution known as the federal reserve, America is bankrupt, and a shell of its former self – it’s productive capacity has been gutted.
    Admit that you are owned by those who you owe that debt to – such as China.

    After you can admit all of those things, start speaking to those you now see as enemies.
    See if they will admit the same things.

    Then both of you can admit you have common ground, and you can work together to make America Great again.

    Regards

    E.A. Blair

  • E.A. Blair

    April 18, 2010

    Hello Taxpayer

    You Say

    Just how much political discussion – argument – can actually be objective?

    As much as you like – first off – focus on objective issues, those that actually matter to peoples live in a real way – their Rights, Property, and Wealth.

    From Rays book, “Leave us Alone” – P.4

    If you desire to know precisely what someone’s political viewpoint is, all you
    need do is find out his or her stance on property; for it is through the stance on
    property that the entire political philosophy is disclosed. You needn’t listen to anything
    anyone says about “freedom” or “liberty” or any of these other easy platitudes: no
    one in her right mind will go against those things. Instead, simply check the stance
    on property. If someone doesn’t believe in full private property rights, that person
    is, to the exact extent he or she denies private property rights, a statist.


    Speak to the people you now see as enemies – see where they stand.

    Argue this point – it all flows from there.

    From Tibor Machan – “The Ethics of Tax Resistance”

    Governments hate it when you succeed at escaping their tyrannical reach and so we have been witnessing extensive efforts by the feds to curtail tax dodging and avoidance. This has led to some considerable pressure exerted on banks in Switzerland, Lichtenstein and other places with serious bank secrecy laws, to release the names of those who bank there hoping to escape the IRS. (The U. S. government wields not only military might!) Extorting money from the citizenry is the bread and butter of governments. No serious effort has ever been made even in America to find and implement ways of funding the legal system without using extortionist methods. Yet, how could one have an unalienable right to one’s life and liberty and such while government puts a gun to one’s head saying, “Your money or you go to jail”?


    The problem is not governments of the right or the left, it is all government – intruding into our lives – telling us how to live.

    Those who do not own their own labour are not taxpayers they are serfs, slaves.

    Maybe you should change your moniker.

    LAISSEZ-NOUS FAIRE

  • E.A. Blair

    April 18, 2010

    Hi taxpayer

    You say

    So why is Nick so worked up over my comment, and so nonplussed over what the Democrats are doing to our country? Stupidisasliberaldoes, maybe?

    Why are you so nonplussed over what the Republicans have done to your country?

    Just wondering

    Regards.

    E.A. Blair

  • Taxpayer

    April 18, 2010

    E.A., you say some things I cannot agree with.

    “That country no longer exists.” The American spirit is evident in the Tea Party movement, whose overwhelming call is for a return to our Constitution, followed by limiting the government, reducing the debt, fiscal responsibility, less government intrusion, lower taxes.

    I’m not so sure Reagan was a statist. I realize he permitted expansions, but remember he was dealing with a Congress loaded with liberals. Now, you want to say “no Congress for the 100 years has been anything but statist interventionist” I’d have to vehemently agree.

    I don’t want to argue again about the wars, especially Iraq, but dispute the myth the Iraq war “was started based on a lie.” You have accepted a deliberate deception aimed at destroying Bush and giving us our current political regime when you make this statement. I suggest you read Rove’s version of this, where he clearly documents who the liars really are.

    Beck and Palin are dangerous? In what way, and to who? Funny, you don’t want me to admit Obama and Pelosi aren’t ticking time bombs, they are explosions in action, doing real, not perceived, harm right now.

    Fox News propaganda? Perhaps. So where would you have us get our news? I’ve seen them hold both parties to task, and the virtual refusal of those in power to take questions from that source says something, as opposed to the obvious use of the other outlets to make unchallenged and unverified assertions.

    Now, “social wedge issues…to divide and conquer.” Wow, no shit!

    “America is now seen in much of the world as an Heartless Imperial Power.” I agree, but I ask you why is that? I assert it is in large part due to the anti-American rhetoric of political climbers on the left amplified by the anti-American echo chamber of the statist media. What you describe is a perception, not a reality, at least on the part of the people.

    “America…is…a shell of its former self – its productive capacity has been gutted.” Ouch. We know this, are powerless to do anything about it, and lament it. Somehow, we the people must put a stop to this. Would that be part of the outcome of a successful Tea Party movement?

    Do your homework on the debt. True, China holds a large portion, some $800B+, but that is not the lion’s share of $12T. In reality, it is “the despicable institution known as the federal reserve” that holds the lion’s share. In other words, the insidious bastards are monetizing the debt!

    Ray’s quote, right on. The problem with the stand of many of “the people you now see as enemies” is that they actually want socialism. As long as they embrace a socialist philosophy, they are an enemy to private property and freedom. In “More and More Unto the Perfect Day”, Ray says: “Philosophy is the source from which every subsequent thing flows. Whether the idea is scientific, political, aesthetic, technological, or anything else, philosophy is the source. Thoughts shape deeds.” Indeed.

    You say “Those who do not own their own labour are not taxpayers they are serfs, slaves.” We do need to collaborate to achieve greater things, and give up some ownership of our labor to that end. I think, however, what you really mean is that when government seizes our labor for “the greater good” based on “the commerce clause”, that’s when we are enslaved. I can still quit my job, but my doctor is now a slave of the state. Don’t you think the discriminator here has to do with voluntary versus involuntary?

    “Why are you so nonplussed over what the Republicans have done to your country?” You draw the wrong conclusion. I suffer from “take me to your lizard” (Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy). I see a glimmer, in some Republicans, of non-statist philosophy. I have a dream (delusion?) that the American spirit (Tea Party) can – through the Republican Party – turn us back from the brink that the Democrats are hell-bent on taking us over.

  • E.A. Blair

    April 19, 2010

    Hi Taxpayer

    The American spirit is evident in the Tea Party movement, whose overwhelming call is for a return to our Constitution, followed by limiting the government, reducing the debt, fiscal responsibility, less government intrusion, lower taxes.

    Agreed – too bad the mainstream, corporatist republican party is trying to take it over – hopefully they won’t succeed.

    I’m not so sure Reagan was a statist. I realize he permitted expansions, but remember he was dealing with a Congress loaded with liberals.

    Of course, there was Iran-Contra, CIA smuggling cocaine into the USA, the S&L Bailout – which set the stage for the other great Republican bailout of the banks in 2008

    I don’t want to argue again about the wars, especially Iraq, but dispute the myth the Iraq war “was started based on a lie.”… I suggest you read Rove’s version of this, where he clearly documents who the liars really are.

    Iraq was absolutely based on a lie. That cannot be denied.
    Did you ever see the clip where Bush jokes about the non-existent WMD?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VD1gOhpRSU
    Explain that one.
    How many Americans and Iraqis died for that joke, that lie.
    There is another particulary good set of clips showing the before and after quotes from Cheney et al.
    What was that other one? Yellow Cake?
    How about this one – Atta in Prague, meeting with Iraqi Intelligence Agents

    MR. RUSSERT: And now we have the Select Committee on Intelligence coming out with a report on Friday, it says here, “A declassified report released [Friday] by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence revealed that U.S. intelligence analysts were strongly disputing the alleged links between Saddam Hussein and al-Qaeda while senior Bush administration officials were publicly asserting those links to justify invading Iraq.” You said here that it was pretty well confirmed that Atta may have had a meeting in Prague, that that was credible. All the while, according to the Senate Intelligence Committee in January and in June and in September, the CIA was saying that wasn’t the case.

    Please post some excerpts from Roves version of events – can that man speak without lying?.

  • E.A. Blair

    April 19, 2010

    Beck and Palin are dangerous? In what way, and to who? Funny, you don’t want me to admit Obama and Pelosi aren’t ticking time bombs, they are explosions in action, doing real, not perceived, harm right now.

    I want you to admit that all of them are dangerous. So is Newt Gingrich – have you seen his ad with Pelosi where they are calling for carbon taxes?
    By the way, did you hear about how Beck and O’reilly are calling for more taxes? Specifically a VAT Tax? I guess Conservatives are for higher taxes now. You only need to watch the first minute.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYRZgIL-hUk
    Are you for higher taxes?
    As For Palin, she is a talking head, a ventriloquists dummy, who is she speaking for?

    Fox News propaganda? Perhaps. So where would you have us get our news? I’ve seen them hold both parties to task, and the virtual refusal of those in power to take questions from that source says something, as opposed to the obvious use of the other outlets to make unchallenged and unverified assertions.

    You mean where would you have us get our Propaganda?
    You could always go directly to the source just read the White House press releases – do they ever ask anything but softballs?
    You could watch Russia Today
    Listen to Alex Jones
    http://www.democracynow.org/
    http://wikileaks.org/
    http://cryptome.org/

  • E.A. Blair

    April 19, 2010

    Now, “social wedge issues…to divide and conquer.” Wow, no shit!

    So what are you going to do about it?

    I agree, but I ask you why is that? I assert it is in large part due to the anti-American rhetoric of political climbers on the left amplified by the anti-American echo chamber of the statist media. What you describe is a perception, not a reality, at least on the part of the people.

    I am talking about the way the world sees America.
    The atrocities being comitted in the name of the American Taxpayer are being seen by the entire world, but hidden from the American People.
    http://www.collateralmurder.com/
    http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/06/12/marine.puppy/index.html
    America is an Empire – PAX AMERICANA

    “America…is…a shell of its former self – its productive capacity has been gutted.” Ouch. We know this, are powerless to do anything about it, and lament it. Somehow, we the people must put a stop to this. Would that be part of the outcome of a successful Tea Party movement?

    Hopefully – if you reach out to all members of the American Public.
    Watch out for “Agent Provocateurs”

    Do your homework on the debt. True, China holds a large portion, some $800B+, but that is not the lion’s share of $12T. In reality, it is “the despicable institution known as the federal reserve” that holds the lion’s share. In other words, the insidious bastards are monetizing the debt!

    Agreed – I do need to do my homework on the US debt. But correct me if I am wrong – the debt that is held by the Fed is held by the US Government and the Private Banks that run the Fed.
    How much Debt is held worldwide?
    If the Chinese Dumped all of the $800B+ what percentage would that be of the entire foreign held debt? Would that sink the US dollar?

    We do need to collaborate to achieve greater things, and give up some ownership of our labor to that end. I think, however, what you really mean is that when government seizes our labor for “the greater good” based on “the commerce clause”, that’s when we are enslaved. I can still quit my job, but my doctor is now a slave of the state. Don’t you think the discriminator here has to do with voluntary versus involuntary?

    So you give up 30%+ of your income voluntarily? What would happen if you didn’t pay your property taxes or your income taxes? You would be put in Jail.
    How about what your tax money is being used for? Slaughtering Iraqis? Is that the American People collaborating to achieve greater things?
    Here are some quotes from Dr. Paul Craig Roberts – Father of Reaganomics

    Generally speaking, the higher your income, the less you own of yourself. A person with $300,000 in taxable income will discover that government in the year 2002 has a claim to about one-third of his labor – the maximum tax that could be levied on a medieval Serf….

    Income taxes are not the only taxes. There are property taxes, wealth taxes, excise taxes, and sales taxes. If you add together all the taxes you paid, you might find that you own no more of your own income than a 19th century slave. (A slave owed his master about half his work product, the rest being necessary for his own maintenance.)

    Read the whole article here
    http://www.vdare.com/roberts/democracy_serfs.htm

    I see a glimmer, in some Republicans, of non-statist philosophy. I have a dream (delusion?) that the American spirit (Tea Party) can – through the Republican Party – turn us back from the brink that the Democrats are hell-bent on taking us over.

    And what exactly was the Republican party doing from 2000 until 2008?

    Well maybe you should run for office on a Republican-Libertarian Ticket.

    Give Ron Paul a Call – I am sure he would be glad to get the support.

    http://www.ronpaul.com/2010-04-18/ron-paul-end-the-mandate/

    Phone Number: (202) 225-2831

  • Nick

    April 21, 2010

    TAX: “You’re right, I’m damaged goods.”
    Admitting it is the first step towards recovery.

    TAX: “Serving my country, like my Dad in WWII and Korea, is of no value”
    Of course it’s of value.

    TAX: “and the worldwide humanitarian efforts of our military counts for naught.”
    Value is all relative. Ask a 65-year-old man in Hanoi what our humanitarian efforts count for.

    TAX: “I don’t trust your sources, BTW.”
    There’s a shocker.

    TAX: “Yep, your comment confirms the typical liberal denigration of Americans.”
    Calling you a moron is something both parties can most likely get behind. It could be the one issue that brings this great country back together!

    TAX: “What I need is a good dose of that Stupidisasliberaldoes drug you enjoy.”
    No seeds or stems here!

    TAX: “Then I could be a vitriolic asshole like you…”
    Never in your wildest dreams could you attain that level.

    TAX: “who adores all things liberal and lives in denial of the assault on our freedom.”
    Says who?

    TAX: “And, of course, you go for the personal attack.”
    I play to the level of my competition.

    TAX: “So, get Obama’s dick out of your mouth…”
    Once you go black…

    TAX: “…and name one thing about liberal policy you disagree with.”
    I’m in favor of abortion-as long as it’s retroactive.

    E.A. Blair: “I wonder Nick – is that private charitable giving? Or is that giving by their Socialist governments?
    I think that was actually government spending. Then again, it’s spending by governments put in place by the people. The United States does does do better in many statistics when private contributions are added in, but those numbers (like any numbers) tend to get murky. One big section of contributions are remittances, which is money sent from people in the U.S. back to those people’s home countries. It gets murky because of the obvious: if the Mexican kid who mows my lawn sends half his money back to his family in Tijuana, is it really a “private U.S. contribution?”

    Here’s a look at some figures where private contributions are factored in. Hopefully the link will work.
    http://www.globalissues.org/article/35/us-and-foreign-aid-assistance#AdjustingAidNumberstoFactorPrivateContributionsandmore

    My point with all this is not that people in the U.S. are stingy dickwads. It’s that other people in the world also donate a lot of money, and often more.

    E.A. BLAIR: “And does giving away free guns count?”
    Ain’t no such thing as a free gun.

    E.A. BLAIR: “Absolutely Skewers him.”
    Say what? I didn’t even write anything in that thread.

    TAX: “You’re right about Nick, of course.”
    Ha.

  • E.A.Blair

    April 22, 2010

    Hi Nick
    You Say

    I think that was actually government spending. Then again, it’s spending by governments put in place by the people.

    I believe Bush was put in by the US supreme Court in 2000.
    Personally I don’t think Gore would have been all that much better.
    As for the other countries, they are democratic, but I don’t know that they have any kind of plebiscite on Charitable giving, just vague notions that they want to help
    Speaking of Welfare for the Third world, you should check out what African Economic Activist James Shikwati thinks of it.
    http://www.spiegel.de/international/spiegel/0,1518,363663,00.html

    The United States does do better in many statistics when private contributions are added in, but those numbers (like any numbers) tend to get murky.

    There you go Taxpayer – you stand vindicated.
    Nick – does that mean your numbers from the OECD are murky as well?
    How about the numbers concerning the temperature rise stemming from a doubling of CO2 by 2075? Are they “Settled”?

    if the Mexican kid who mows my lawn sends half his money back to his family in Tijuana, is it really a “private U.S. contribution?”

    Yes it is.
    My Ancestors once moved here from Hungary and would help out by sending money back. After the War, they all moved here.
    By the, I would like to get some Mexicans to mow my lawn too – can you send some up to Canada?
    Now what about private citizens giving within their own countries? how does the US measure up compared to other countries when it comes to that stat. I would be interested to see if there is a relationship between the amount of tax ones pays, and the level of government sevices, and the amount that people give to Charities – maybe poverty becomes the “governments” problem in highly socialised countries. Giving people an “out”. I certainly see that in my own city, especially when it comes to Environmental issues.

    My point with all this is not that people in the U.S. are stingy dickwads. It’s that other people in the world also donate a lot of money, and often more.

    Big deal – since when do we have to measure our national worth against charitable giving. As far as I am concerned we should stop global welfare – help these countries to stand on their own two feet.

    Ain’t no such thing as a free gun.

    Neither is there a free lunch. Or free welfare, or free healthcare.
    As for a free gun – talk to this man – he’ll give you one if you sign up for his shooting training course. I might take him up on the offer.
    https://www.frontsight.com/free-gun.asp

    Say what? I didn’t even write anything in that thread.

    Wasn’t talking about you.
    Was referring to
    http://rayharvey.org/index.php/2010/02/the-great-overpopulation-myth/#comment-658 
    And the way I used numbers, like you did, to crush his argument.
    My numbers weren’t as murky as your were however.
    Best regards
    E.A. Blair
     

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